Category archives for: Space & Physics

That Word You Heard: Syzygy

That Word You Heard: Syzygy

“In 18 years precisely, a planets will align ever so nicely.” This informed rhyme from Disney’s Hercules was partial of a anticipation meant for Hades, God of a underworld. But it’s also flattering damn tighten to this word’s many common systematic definition: when one astronomical intent aligns with another. (The term, conspicuous SIZ-uh-jee, also pops […]

What if We Discovered an Alien Civilization Less Advanced Than Our Own?

What if We Discovered an Alien Civilization Less Advanced Than Our Own?

Never mind Star Trek‘s Squire of Gothos; what if we unequivocally found an visitor civilization during a 16th-century turn of technological development? How would we know? How could we make contact–and should we? (Credit: Paramount) Readers of this blog know that I’m a large fan of Quora, given it lets non-experts lift a kinds of […]

What if We Discovered an Alien Civilization Less Advanced Than Our Own?

What if We Discovered an Alien Civilization Less Advanced Than Our Own?

Never mind Star Trek‘s Squire of Gothos; what if we unequivocally found an visitor civilization during a 16th-century turn of technological development? How would we know? How could we make contact–and should we? (Credit: Paramount) Readers of this blog know that I’m a large fan of Quora, given it lets non-experts lift a kinds of […]

This overwhelming picture of Jupiter from NASA’s Juno booster is simply out of this universe — solely it’s not

This overwhelming picture of Jupiter from NASA’s Juno booster is simply out of this universe — solely it’s not

The filagree of windy patterns during Jupiter’s south stick bears an scary similarity to a materialisation here on Earth Enhanced tone viewpoint of Jupiter’s south pole, combined by citizen scientist Gabriel Fiset regulating information from a JunoCam instrument on NASA’s Juno spacecraft. (Source: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Gabriel Fiset) When we spotted this picture of Jupiter on NASA’s website, we […]

Building Blocks

Building Blocks

HEAVY METAL MISSIONS In January, NASA announced skeleton to send a booster to revisit Psyche, a steel asteroid that could be a passed planet’s core, in 2023. Also on rug during a agency: a booster aiming for an asteroid organisation nearby Jupiter in 2021. The missions’ aim is to move the solar system’s expansion into […]

World Weary? The Best Is Yet to Come

World Weary? The Best Is Yet to Come

Scientists are meddlesome in biosignatures, or combinations of molecules indicating a participation of life as it breathes, eats, photosynthesizes or differently interacts chemically with a environment. Biological processes like these leave chemical concentrations out of their healthy equilibrium, revelation scientists that something — or someone — contingency be altering them. On Earth, for instance, a […]

Seeing Stars

Seeing Stars

With small fanfare, though, a few groups of dynamic researchers kept advancing toward a stars — despite during an agonizing, incremental pace. Starting in a late 1980s, a partnership between a U.S. Navy and a Lowell Observatory began building a Navy Precision Optical Interferometer (NPOI) in Arizona. Around a same time, during Georgia State University’s […]

Exploding Sea Cucumber Butt Threads Are a New Material

Exploding Sea Cucumber Butt Threads Are a New Material

Whoever named a sea cucumber after a unfeeling didn’t give it adequate credit. Yes, sea cucumbers are soft, warty tubes that scoot eyelessly along a seafloor. But they aren’t helpless. Some secrete a poison that’s lethal to other animals. And some, when threatened, fire gummy threads out of their anuses to tangle adult predators. When researchers collected these […]

When Will It be ‘Game Over’ For a Universe?

When Will It be ‘Game Over’ For a Universe?

These Are Not a End   Ask a fanciful cosmologist how a star will end, and one of the first things you’ll hear is how many options are still on a table. “It’s very formidable to tell how a star will finish usually from local measurements,” explains a University of Pennsylvania’s Mark Trodden. There’s small we […]

Women Scientists of Antiquity

Women Scientists of Antiquity

2700 B.C.: Merit Ptah The Egyptian medicine was a initial lady in medicine, and maybe all of science, mentioned by name in texts. Her son, a high priest, called her “the arch physician,” and her mural appears in a tomb in a Valley of a Kings. 2300 B.C.: Enheduanna A Sumerian lady allocated as high […]

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